Doll Mods

Hello! While I’m waiting for electronic parts to arrive, I’ve been working on some doll modifications.

I re-flocked this fella’s hair and gave the top a trim.
Yeah, that is actually light outside my workshop window. Finally!

I’m also continuing work on my cat girl doll. You might remember that she came to me with a broken leg. I re-designed her knee joints to make them stronger (using metal instead of plastic). However, the new joints, though strong and very flexible, are rather ugly. So I tried to cover them with some fur-textured epoxy paste.

Hmm, interesting concept but not quite how I imagined it.
They look okay-ish when straight but you can probably see a bit of a gap in the back there.

I’ll probably end up using something like this aesthetic as I continue to experiment. For now, I need to study the other dolls I have collected to see how those manufacturers do their joints and see what I can learn.

As an artist or craftsman, it’s never a bad idea to take the time to learn more about your craft. Time spent practising is never time wasted. Perhaps you’d like to follow along as I take a look at doll joints?

Working on Witchlights

Yep. I’m still hacking away at this project. I’m frustrated, but also very, very stubborn. I managed to mess up my first casting of the year and ended up having to clean uncured, sticky resin goo out of my mould. Hopefully that was just a derp in measuring the quantities of part A and B.

Yesterday, I had a bit of excitement while re-doing that casting. When I started pouring in the resin, it began leaking out of the mould. I realised I had not tied the cord around it tightly enough. Now, because the resin had already been mixed and I had only about 10 minutes left before it gelled, I couldn’t go pull the box of ties down from the shelf, fish out the ball of string, wind it around tight and cut it before the whole operation was ruined.

I stood there, holding onto both sides of the mould, pressing them together, trying to problem solve on the fly. Aha! If I could run into my dust tent, grab a clamp, and get back before too much resin leaked out, I could save the casting! So I did. I dashed into my dust-containment tent, grabbed the first clamp I could get my hands on and ran back to the mould.

Yes, the first clamp I could get my hands on … was about 3 times bigger than the mould itself. LOL! You gotta do what you gotta do eh?

Well, it stopped the leakage sure enough! Today, we will see if the resin cured and, if it did, if the casting will line up correctly with the other half of the witchlight. If it does, I can install the magnets and get to work on the electronics!

If it doesn’t … uh … well I learned something from the experience? Yeah, it will be back to the drawing board for the witchlight project. Well, if it was easy, it would already be available on the market. It isn’t. I know because I want one and I’ve hunted everywhere. I think my company motto is going to be: “Screw it; I’ll do it myself.” Hahaha!

Wish me luck?